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Home Decor and Improvement – the Bedroom and Its Furniture

by Aishwarya Gaikwad
Home Decor and Improvement – the Bedroom and Its Furniture

The bedroom is unlike any other non-wet (i.e. unplumbed) room in the house. It has a pretty specific list of furniture that it must contain in order for it to function properly as a bedroom. Take any of those elements away and the room in question devolves, becoming simply a room with a bed in it.

In general terms, a bedroom needs a bed; a wardrobe; and at least one bedside table or cabinet. Once these three elements are in place, the requirements of the sleeping and relaxing person are covered. Other furniture, such as a desk or a dressing table, may be added in the event that a person or persons has or have specific intentions for how they will use the room.

The furniture you specify for a bedroom, then, does two things. It performs specific functions within the roles of the room; and it creates a visual cue by which the personality of the room is set up and decoded.

A lot of bedroom furniture is made from wood. Therefore, departures from wood, or situations whereby wood is used but in a non-traditional way (perhaps it is coloured, for example) can provide strong clues as to the personality of the room and therefore the overall personality or aesthetic of the home.

A bedroom that is used daily by the same person or people should have a feel that combines well with their personality. A bedroom used as an occasional guest room is different. Here, the home owner may choose to create a fairly neutral space, into which the guest may bring his or her own personality – or he or she may choose to create a more stentorian space in which the guest is encouraged to view aspects of the home owner’s personality.

Coloured wood can add depth and character to a room in different ways. A black bed frame and black bedside cabinets, for instance, can create a very metropolitan look – particularly when used in conjunction with bare brick and wooden floors. IN a room of this nature the decorative touches are really provided by lamps and rugs, and the occasional picture on the walls.

A red or blue bed may denote a child’s room. Obviously, there are other cues that help to define a room as specifically for kids – there may be decorated wallpaper or novelty furniture items, and there are likely to be a number of toys as well.

Wherever colours are used, rather than natural wood tones, it is important that the overall colour palette of the room is taken into account. Black bedside cabinets, for instance, may demand that other elements of the room’s furniture are also black – but that there is not black in the main colour areas (the carpet, the walls and the ceiling. Black curtains may be used to tie the room together, or a dark coloured rug – though the room designer should beware of using too much in the way of black where the major wood colour is so dark. A second, dark but rich colour, could be brought into the equation to create harmony and diversity.

Black furniture needs the right finishing touches, too. A classical bedside lamp, for example, doesn’t look right on a black bedside table – whereas an Art Deco lamp does. As soon as you begin making statements, you have to follow them through.

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